Thursday, 12 December 2019

Shadows in the Green: The Kelyuvat and Kelyugan for Blood & Treasure


Kelyuvat, Kelyugan (Pteridian Tree-kin)

Small, furtive and resilient, the Kelyuvat and their close kin the Kelyugan draw upon the essence and morphology of ferns (in the case of the Kelyugan, a specific type of fern, bracken, is the source of the botanical side of their being). Both of the fern-folk can be found in a multiplicity of marginal habitats: forested riverbanks and dells, swamps, peat bogs, cold hillsides and isolated mountain valleys. The primary difference between the two diminutive races is that the Kelyuvat are generally sweet-natured, if somewhat retiring, whilst the Kelyugan are aggressive and expansionist in nature – often at the expense of their fellow fern-folk. Both races are known for their close relationship with Fey, but, whereas the Kelyuvat confine themselves to the less obstreperous faerie folk, the Kelyugan are far less discriminating. Most Kelyuvat are Neutral in alignment – though there is a significant Lawful minority. The Kelyugan are generally Neutral, but the most powerful and outward-looking are almost universally Chaotic in temperament and ethos.

Both tribes of the fern-folk are very small, averaging 24” in height with a 20’ movement rate. Both appear even shorter as they tend to hunch over in their daily lives, as keeping low in the undergrowth is an almost compulsory survival strategy for these small beings. However, like the fern, they can unfurl dramatically, suddenly leaping a surprising distance for their size. The colouring of the two tribes is similar: both have green-hued skin and dark, large eyes that dominate their small faces, but the Kelyugan have hair that resembles light-brown leaves of the bracken, whilst the Kelyuvat have hair the rich green of well-watered ferns. All fern-folk being play knowing Ketelcqa, Vaerylle and one local human tongue (generally Yrenaic, Urdrinn or Avronakiyan). Kelyugan also know the language Tur at the commencement of their adventuring careers.

The fern-folk are nimble, gaining +1 to Dexterity, but the Kelyuvat are prone to foolishness, giving them a -1 to Wisdom, whilst the domineering Kelyugan lose -1 from Charisma. The small size of the fern-folk gives both types a -2 to Strength. Both kinds of the Pteridian Tree-kin have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/16, INT 3/18, WIS 3/18, DEX 9/18, CON 3/18, and CHA 3/18. They roll 2d4 + 4 for their Heritage score.

As noted above, both kinds of fern-folk are on good terms with various kinds of Fey: Kelyuvat add +1 to all reaction rolls with Lawful or Neutral Fey, whilst Kelyugan gain the same bonus with Neutral and Chaotic Fey.

All fern-folk gain +2 to Move Silently and Hide in Shadows checks. They can also jump from a standing start as if they were of Medium size, with a Strength ability 2 higher, and taking a running jump (thus a fern-folk with a Strength of 7 can jump 6’ from a standing start, whereas a creature of similar size and Strength could only manage 2.5’).

Fern-folk may be of the following classes: Acrobat, Alchemist, Animorph, Antipaladin, Assassin (Kelyugan only), Bard, Beastmaster, Druid, Fey Mage, Jester, Knight of Flowers, Magic-User (Abjurer, Conjurer, Diviner, Enchanter, Evoker, Illusionist, Necromancer, Transmuter), Marksman, Ranger, Scout, Shadowdancer (Kelyugan only), Shaman (Kelyuvat only), Sorceror, Thief, Warlock.

They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Beastmaster-Sorceror, Marksman-Scout, and Scout-Sorceror.

Like other Tree-kin. the Fern-Folk are susceptible to Charm Plant spells, in addition to the normal human range of vulnerabilities (i.e. Charm Person). They also gain resistance to piercing and slashing attacks, but are vulnerable to chopping and fire attacks. Finally, they gain a +1 to all saving throws against poison, sleep, paralysis, polymorph an stunning attacks.

All Tree-folk are bipedal humanoids.

Thursday, 28 November 2019

A Rose By Any Other Name: The Gereans for Blood & Treasure


One of the more remarkable outcomes of the Shroudfall was the fusion of plant and human leading to the creation of new races. These races, for the most part, appear as human (although with some plant traits, particularly relating to build and skin). The influence of their plant heritage manifests more as ‘metaphysical’ aspects: odd talents for various kinds of endeavour, magic and the wild. Although there are potentially endless varieties of Tree-folk (and not all are actually Tree-folk at all, being a fusion of other plants and human life), only the most well-known are detailed below.

All Treefolk are susceptible to Charm Plant spells, in addition to the normal human range of vulnerabilities (i.e. Charm Person). They also gain resistance to piercing and slashing attacks, but are vulnerable to chopping and fire attacks. Finally, they gain a +1 to all saving throws against poison, sleep, paralysis, polymorph an stunning attacks.

All Tree-folk are bipedal humanoids.



Gerean (Rosaceous Tree-kin)
One of the rarest of the already uncommon Tree-kin, the fragile Gereans are famed far beyond their numbers for their charm, beauty…and their thorny natures when thwarted or threatened. Their essence is that of the rose. Most Gereans are Neutral in alignment (although there have been significant examples across history of remarkable Gereans of Lawful and Chaotic alignment).

Gereans are of a similar height to Elves, averaging 60”, with a movement rate of 30’. They are extremely wiry, with deep red-brown skin, soft falls of white, red or pink hair, dark brown eyes and – of course – rosebud lips. They begin play knowing one human lingua franca (usually Yrenaic, Kanastasi, Urdrinn or Avronakiyan).

The Gereans are simultaneously frail and tough, and possessed of a compelling presence, gaining +1 to Charisma and Constitution, but losing 2 from Strength. They have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/15, INT 3/18, WIS 3/18, DEX 6/18, CON 8/18, and CHA 9/19. They roll 3d4 +4 for their Heritage score.

Gereans are blessed with a number of unique powers: their slightly ligneous skin grants them a +1 to their AC and, once per day, can sprout thorns that grant an additional 1d2 hit points of damage to any unarmed attack and grants a +1 to Grapple attacks against any foes wearing cloth or leather.

They can also exude a sweet-scented perfume that adds +2 to any reaction rolls and increases the difficulty of any saving throws against enchantment spells cast by the Gerean by 2. This odour disperses in 1d6 rounds, but clings to the Gerean for one hour per round of duration, making them much easier to track (granting any trackers a +4 bonus to follow the Gerean).
Finally, Gereans can exude a healing sap that heals 1d3 hit points. They can perform this feat several times per day, up to a maximum of 1 + CON bonus (minimum of 1). It takes 2 rounds to produce the sap in sufficient amounts to heal someone. Producing the sap fatigues the Gerean for one round.

Lawful Gereans can also exude a sap that, when ingested, allows a second saving throw against mind-controlling magic or illusions, with an added bonus equivalent to the Gerean’s CHA modifier. They can only do this once per day, and doing so fatigues the Gerean for 1d8 minutes.

Chaotic Gereans can produce the dreaded Attar of Madness, a thick liquid that functions as a Type I poison (regardless of whether or not a saving throw is passed). If the saving throw is passed, the target still sleeps for 1d6 rounds but suffers no other penalty. If the saving throw is failed, however, upon waking, the victim is afflicted with insanity. This lasts for a number of hours equivalent to the Gerean’s level + their CON modifier.

The Attar of Madness can be consumed in several ways, with different modifiers to the saving throw: if ingested normally, there is no modification to the saving throw. If applied to an arrow, bolt or blade, the saving throw is made with a +1 bonus. The Attar can also be burned in a censer, creating a 10’ radius cloud that lasts for 1d4 rounds. Anyone breathing in the smoke of the Attar saves with a +4 bonus, but failure is more serious, with the victim losing 1d4 points across their INT, WIS and CHA (the first point is deducted from INT. if a 2 was rolled, the second point is deducted from WIS. Rolling a 3 means that CHA also loses a point, and, in the unfortunate event of a 4 being rolled, a second point of INT is removed). Producing the Attar takes 1d4 minutes, can only be done once per week and costs the Gerean 1d2 points of CON that recover at the rate of 1 point per week.

All saps produced by Gereans can only be stored for a full day before losing their efficacy.
Neutral Gereans cannot exude any special saps (they still gain the ability to create healing sap and their charming aroma), but do gain the ability to speak with plants, and gain +1 to Survival checks.

Gereans may pursue the following classes: Acrobat, Anticleric, Assassin, Bard, Beastmaster, Cavalier, Chaos Mage, Charlatan, Chevalier, Cleric, Demonologist, Druid, Duellist, Fey Mage, Fighter, Jester, Knight of Flowers, Leech, Magic-User (Abjurer, Conjurer, Diviner, Enchanter, Evoker, Illusionist, Necromancer, Transmuter), Marksman, Monk, Paladin, Priest (Creation, Death, Fighting, Guardian, Scholar, Travel, Trickster, Weird), Puritan, Ranger, Scout, Sentinel, Shadowdancer, Shaman, Sorceror, Thief, Venturer, Warlock, Wizard Hunter, Woodsman.

They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Assassin-Demonologist, Assassin-Enchanter, Assassin-Necromancer, Charlatan-Enchanter, Enchanter-Venturer, Enchanter-Fighter, Fighter-Thief, Fighter-Sorceror, Leech-Abjurer, Scout-Diviner, Scout-Sorceror, Scout-Venturer, Sorceror-Thief, Sorceror-Venturer, Thief-Diviner, Thief-Enchanter and Thief-Venturer.

Sunday, 17 November 2019

Grounded Gulls: The Miravi for Blood & Treasure


Disliked but tolerated by ‘civilised’ society, the gull-like Miravi are a common sight in littoral regions – and the down-at-heel parts of human cities. These swaggering mariners and scavengers make their way any way they can – a modus vivendi that often leads to criminality…or poverty. Some few are traders or warriors, but most pursue the path of extra-legal activity. Not actually evil by nature, most Miravi favour Neutral alignments.

Miravi average 60” in height and have a movement rate of 30’. Miravi are avian bipeds with arms in place of wings. They retain the head of a gull, and have downy soft feathers on their torso, neck, lower legs and arms. They are usually white and black in colour. Most have black beaks, although some – the infamously ill-tempered ‘red-beaks’ differ. Miravi generally live short lives, most dying in their fifties, although some lucky – and sensible – individuals live as long as humans. They begin play knowing one human lingua franca (usually Yrenaic, Kanastasi, Urdrinn or Avronakiyan).

Miravi are healthy and swift, gaining +2 to Constitution and +1 to Dexterity, but lack a solid musculature, caution and have a prickly temperament. They therefore receive a -1 penalty to Strength, Wisdom and Charisma. There are two other varieties of Miravi, the violent Red-beaks and the stately Mollymawks. Red-beaks have no penalty to Strength, but have a -2 to penalty to Wisdom. Mollymawks receive no penalty to Strength or Wisdom, but lose their bonus to Dexterity. All Miravi have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/17, INT 3/18, WIS 3/17, DEX 4/18, CON 10/19, and CHA 3/17. Miravi and Redbeaks roll 1d4 + 2 for their Heritage score, whilst Mollymawks roll 1d6 + 3.

All Miravi are noted for their ‘iron guts’, an ability to eat or drink more or less anything and survive. They gain a +2 to saving throws against ingested poisons and parasitic diseases (this bonus is only +1 for the more selective Mollymawks and +3 for the feral Redbeaks).
Miravi are also excellent swimmers and divers, gaining a +1 bonus to all such task checks.
Finally, Miravi can fight using their sharp beaks, doing 1d2 damage (1d2 +1 for the slightly larger Mollymawks).

Miravi may choose from the following classes:  Acrobat, Alchemist (Mollymawks only), Assassin, Barbarian (Redbeaks and standard Miravi only), Bard, Bounty Hunter, Chaos Mage, Cleric, Curmudgeon, Diablo, Duellist, Druid (Mollymawks only), Fighter, Jester, Mariner, Pariah (Redbeaks and standard Miravi only), Poltroon (Redbeaks only), Priest (Fighting, Travel or Trickster), Prophet (Mollymawks only), Saboteur, Scout, Sea Dog, Sorceror (Mollymawks only), Thief, Tomb Raider and  Venturer (Redbeaks may not become Venturers, as they have a rather direct method of settling trade disputes).

They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Fighter-Thief, Mariner-Thief, Sea Dog-Chaos Mage, Sea Dog-Sorceror (Mollymawks only), Sea Dog-Venturer, and Sea Dog-Thief.

Friday, 1 November 2019

I Am The Walrus! The Gadnagi for Blood & Treasure


GADNAGI

These unpopular – if somewhat misunderstood – creatures are anthropomorphic walruses, usually only found in the icy southern lands, although some choose to endure warmer climes in the name of trade. Gadnagi have a bad reputation as ruthless traders and mariners who will resort to violence to settle any disputes (commercial or otherwise). The only exclusively Gadnagi settlements are found in the volcanic southern isles, but Gadnagi do have small communities across the deep south, despite their xenophobia and bad tempers.

Gadnagi are 66” in height (on average), but have massive, blubbery bodies that they move around awkwardly on land (20’ movement rate) but very well in water (40’ Swim speed). Their hands and feet are heavily webbed. Their thick hides are brown or grey, their eyes are a dark brown, whilst they have long, thin whiskers around their mouths and above their eyes. They are also possessed of impressive incisors that make them rather awkward of speech, but grant them a fearsome bite (1d6 damage). Gadnagi live for around 100 years. They begin play with their own language, Gadnagi, and one of the following tongues: Avronakiyan, Tur, Urdrinn, Urugraz or Yrenaic.

Gadnagi are extremely robust but clumsy and unfriendly. They gain 2 Constitution but lose 1 Dexterity and Charisma. They have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 9/18, INT 3/18, WIS 3/18, DEX 3/15, CON 10/19 and CHA 3/17. They roll 2d6 + 3 for their Heritage score.

Gadnagi are inured to cold, gaining Resistance to any cold attacks. Their tough hide and subcutaneous fat grants them a natural +1 to their Armor Class.

Gadnagi have the following classes open to them: Alchemist, Anticleric, Assassin, Barbarian, Bounty Hunter, Diablo, Fighter, Magic-User (Abjurer, Conjurer, Diviner, Evoker, Necromancer, Transmuter), Mariner, Poltroon, Priest (Death, Fighting, Travel, Weird), Scout, Sea Dog, Thief, Venturer, Warlock.

They may also pursue the following multi-class options: Alchemist-Thief, Alchemist-Venturer, Barbarian-Sea Dog, Fighter-Mariner, Fighter-Priest (Death, Fighting, Travel, Weird), Mariner-Thief, Mariner-Venturer, Scout-Venturer, Sea Dog-Venturer, Thief-Venturer.

Thursday, 17 October 2019

Thralls of Shadow: The Callac for Blood & Treasure


CALLAC

The Callac are an oft-maligned race, regarded with fear and suspicion by most other peoples. This is unfair in the extreme, as the Callac are not naturally evil, but it has been their great misfortune to be subjugated by more powerful races that are most definitely so. Thus the Callac’s natural talents for stealth and magic have been abused and set to work on sinister purposes. Most Callac remain under the thumb of evil powers, but in some regions they have been able to maintain a precarious independence, and it is these Callac who can be found making their tenuous way as adventurers. Given a choice, a Callac will pursue a Neutral alignment.

Callac are, on average, 36”’ tall and have a movement rate of 20’. Their appearance is unprepossessing, to say the least: they are wiry, with pallid skin, lank and greasy hair of a dank green hue. Their eyes are black and without pupils. Callac live for up to 300 years and commence play with their own language, Calzorak and one of the following tongues: Urugraz, Dal-qari, Ulekki or the local human lingua franca (usually Yrenaic or Kanastasi). They possess darkvision up to 60’.

Callac are tough and swift, adding +1 to Constitution and Dexterity, but are physically weak and timid, losing 2 Strength and 1 Charisma. They have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/16, INT 3/18, WIS 3/18, DEX 8/18, CON 8/19, and CHA 3/17. They roll 1d6 + 2 for their Heritage score.

Callac are possessed of considerable talent for certain kinds of magic. Callac Magic-Users learn advanced conjuration, divination and necromancy spells as if their Intelligence score is 1 point higher, and when any Callac casts spells from any of those schools offensively, their target must subtract 1 from their Saving Throw. Callac also gain an automatic +1 to Lore, Move Silently and Hide in Shadows task checks.

Callac have the following classes available to them: Acrobat, Alchemist, Anticleric, Assassin, Bard*, Chthonic Druid, Demoniac, Demonologist, Diablo, Magic-User (Abjurer, Conjurer, Diviner, Enchanter, Evoker, Illusionist, Necromancer, Transmuter), Pariah, Priest (Death, Scholar, Travel, Trickster, Weird), Prophet, Saboteur, Scout, Sentinel, Shadowdancer, Shaman, Sorceror, Thief, Tomb Raider, Warlock, and Wizard Hunter.

They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Alchemist-Demonologist, Alchemist-Thief, Anticleric-Assassin, Anticleric-Thief, Assassin-Enchanter, Assassin-Necromancer, Assassin-Priest (Death or Weird), Assassin-Wizard Hunter, Enchanter-Thief, Acrobat-Sorceror, Sorceror-Scout, Sentinel-Wizard Hunter, Sorceror-Thief, Sorceror-Assassin, Thief-Demonologist and Thief-Diviner. 

*Callac Bards are known as Whisperers, and replace the Bard ability to Carouse with the ability to learn Advanced Necromancy spells (in addition to the normal Basic Magic-User spells) and the Shadowdancer bonus to Hide in Shadows (when within 10’ of shadows). They also lose one spell of each level per day, and must be Chaotic or Neutral in alignment. 

Friday, 11 October 2019

An Elf-Kindred - The Mantarq for Blood & Treasure


The many different peoples (gathered together under the generic heading ‘Elves’) of this still-mighty race are found scattered across the New Kingdoms, in closely guarded kingdoms, hidden realms, subterranean cities or in camps in the wilderness, far from the depredations of human civilization.  All of the considerably variant Elf-kinds are detailed below, but it must be noted firstly that all Elves (even the non-magical Silver Elves) share the traits noted in the Blood & Treasure 2nd edition Rulebook (except where differences are noted below).



Fair Elves (Mantarq)

Deemed by some – although not usually themselves – to be the ‘highest’ kin of the Elves, the Fair Elves are seldom seen in modern times. It is thought that many of the Mantarq have left the world of Verkhün for a paradisaical dimension of their own creation, as safe from the woes of the world as they can contrive. 
However, it is known that some do remain on the Material Plane, usually in the mighty living city Larelain, the Shifter (so named for its habit of moving to different sites around the world – and the multiverse!), or dwelling in the lands of the Keltheldar or Vandori. These folk are motivated to remain in Verkhün by multiple concerns, usually altruistic in nature: some Fair Elves have appointed themselves guardians of particular artifacts, teachers of a certain people or protectors of a region dear to them. Others simply love the world and wish to fight to preserve it. Most Mantarq are Lawful in alignment: it is not unheard of for a Mantarq to be of a different alignment, but it is a very rare occurrence. Such a one generally goes down in history as a great leader, great terror…or both.
Fair Elves average 72” inches in height and have a movement rate of 30’. They are the tallest of the Elves. Their skin is a pale blue, and their hair is silver or white, whilst their eyes are a brilliant indigo. The Mantarq live for 1500 years, and begin play knowing the following languages: Ketelcqa, Old Kantari (their native tongue), Vaerylle and Vandori.
Fair Elves are possessed of considerable force of personality, gaining +2 to Charisma and +1 to Intelligence and Wisdom. They are not physically strong, however, taking a -1 penalty to Strength. The Mantarq have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/17, INT 9/18, WIS 8/17, DEX 4/18, CON 3/18, and CHA 10/19. They roll 2d6 + 6 for Heritage.

Fair Elves share most of the standard traits of Elves, but lose their bonus to Move Silently and chance of Finding Secret Doors, instead gaining the ability to manifest a visible aura of golden light once per day (increases to twice at 6th level and thrice at 18th level). This aura in its basic use grants a temporary bonus equivalent to half the Fair Elf’s level (rounded down, minimum of one) to their Charisma score for one round per level.  Alternatively, it can function as a light spell for 1 minute per level, or provide a temporary Magic Resistance score equivalent to the Fair Elf’s Charisma score + 2% per level (one round per level) or increase AC by the Fair Elf’s Charisma bonus for one minute per level.

They may pursue the following classes: Alchemist, Bard, Cavalier, Chevalier, Cleric, Defender, Druid, Fey Mage, Fighter, Gallant, Knight of Flowers, Leech, Magic-User (Abjurer, Conjurer, Diviner, Enchanter, Evoker, Illusionist, Transmuter), Marksman, Monk, Paladin, Priest (Creation, Guardian, Scholar, Travel), Ranger, Scout, Sentinel, Shaman, Sorceror, Valkyrie, Warlock and Wizard Hunter.

They may also pursue the following multi-class options: Bard-Cleric, Bard-Cavalier, Bard-Scout, Cleric-Fighter, Cleric-Sentinel, Defender-Druid, Defender-Leech, Defender-Abjurer, Diviner-Ranger, Diviner-Sentinel, Diviner-Scout, Sentinel-Abjurer, Scout-Abjurer and Ranger-Abjurer. 

Thursday, 3 October 2019

Goblins Ahoy! Three Cultures for Blood & Treasure


GOBLINS
The Goblins are – in general – a race of rather unpleasant, conniving and violent humanoids that dwell on the wild fringes of civilised lands. Once a purely subterranean people, the small and thin Goblins have long since emerged into the sunlit world and made a place for themselves. Although their society appears rudimentary and primitive, they are well capable of organisation on a large scale, and are known and feared as marauders. There are four distinct groupings of ‘surface’ Goblins, of which three are detailed below:  

Desert Goblins

Desert Goblins are vicious killers, shaped by their life in the harshest of settings. They think nothing of treachery and have no concept of honour. The primary means to success in Desert Goblins society is brute force and low cunning.    Almost all Desert Goblins are Chaotic, although there are Neutral and even Lawful factions among them.

Desert Goblins average 36” in height and they have a movement rate of 20’. Their skin is a dusty shade of tan and their yellow eyes are fixed in a perpetual squint. They seldom live for their full 160 years and begin play with their own language, Tur.

Nimble and tough, Desert Goblins gain a +2 bonus to Dexterity and +1 to Constitution, but their small stature, untrustworthiness and limited mental capabilities cause them to take a -2 penalty to Charisma and a -1 to Strength, Intelligence and Wisdom. They have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/16, INT 3/17, WIS 3/17, DEX 6/19, CON 4/18, and CHA 3/15. They roll 1d6 +2 for their Heritage score.

Desert Goblins gain surprise on a roll of 1-3 on 1d6 in deserts or wastes, and are surprised on a roll of 1 in the same environments. In addition, they gain +1 to hit whilst fighting in deserts and +1 to Survival, Tracking, Move Silently and Hide in Shadows task checks (this bonus increases to +2 in deserts).

The extremely untrusting nature of Desert Goblins renders them less susceptible to enchantment spells, giving them a +3 to saving throws against such magic.
Desert Goblins have the following classes available to them: Anticleric, Assassin, Barbarian, Dervish, Diablo, Druid, Fighter, Priest (Death, Fighting, and Weird), Prophet, Scout, Sentinel, Sorceror, Thief, and Warlock.

They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Assassin-Priest (Death, Fighting, and Weird), Assassin-Sorceror, Fighter-Scout, Fighter-Thief, Scout-Sorceror, and Sorceror-Thief.

Forest Goblins

Throughout the wilder forests of the New Kingdoms and beyond, the Forest Goblins can be found, engaging in petty theft, kidnapping, stealing livestock and – more often than not – fleeing from anyone who does not give way to them immediately.

Forest Goblins average 30” in height and they have a movement rate of 20’. Fearful yellow eyes peer out from beneath hooded lids, and their pale green skin seems to be perpetually coated with sweat. Many Forest Goblins live for 150 years or more, guaranteed a full lifespan by their caution. They commence play with their own language, Tur.

Forest Goblins are slender but surprisingly robust, and they are more intelligent than their Desert kin. They gain +1 to Dexterity and Constitution, but lose 2 Strength and 2 Charisma, as they are extremely timid and lacking in stature. They have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/16, INT 3/18, WIS 3/18, DEX 5/19, CON 4/18, and CHA 3/15. They roll 1d4 +2 for their Heritage score.

Forest Goblins gain surprise on a roll of 1-3 on 1d6 in forests, and are surprised on a roll of 1 in the same environments. In addition, they gain +1 to hit whilst fighting in forests and +1 to Survival, Tracking, Move Silently and Hide in Shadows task checks (this bonus increases to +2 in forests).

Forest Goblins are always ready to duck for cover, and thus gain Lightning Reflexes as a free feat at first level.

Forest Goblins have the following classes available to them: Anticleric, Assassin, Druid, Fighter, Magic-User (Abjurer, Conjurer, Diviner, Necromancer), Priest (Trickster, Weird), Ranger, Scout, Sorceror, Thief.

They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Assassin-Priest (Weird), Assassin-Sorceror, Druid-Scout, Fighter-Scout, Fighter-Thief, Scout-Sorceror, and Sorceror-Thief.

Marsh Goblins

Like most of their kind, Marsh Goblins are notable for all manner of skulduggery, but they are, to some extent, more overt than other Goblins. If the key word for Desert Goblins is treachery, and that of Forest Goblins is cowardice, then Marsh Goblins are best summed up by the word contentious. They are fierce and passionate combatants, willing to fight at a moment’s notice, often to the death. Yet they are also more broad-minded, intelligent and perceptive than most of their kin, and this shows in their uncommon ability to manipulate the senses through the use of illusions, and their combative enjoyment of trade and exploration. Most Marsh Goblins are Chaotic in alignment, but the majority of those who leave the swampland are Neutral.

Marsh Goblins are the smallest of their kind, averaging 30” in height and they have a movement rate of 20’. They are also the most wiry – to the point of appearing emaciated – of the Goblins. Their leathery skin is a muddy khaki in hue, and their thin hair is the putrid green of a stagnant stream. Their eyes, however, are a remarkable emerald colour, and sparkle engagingly during combat or when haggling. Marsh Goblins live for up to 160 years (they usually don’t make it) and begin play with their own language, Tur and a human lingua franca (usually Yrenaic or, Kanastasi) or Ir-ukyn.

Physically robust and agile, but lacking in muscle power and self-discipline, Marsh Goblins gain +2 to Dexterity and +1 to Constitution but lose -2 to Wisdom and Strength and -1 to Charisma, due to their generally feral self-presentation. They have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/14, INT 3/18, WIS 3/16, DEX 6/19, CON 4/18, and CHA 3/17. They roll 2d4 +1 for their Heritage score.

Marsh Goblins gain surprise on a roll of 1-3 on 1d6 in swamps, and are themselves surprised on a roll of 1 in the same environment. In addition, Marsh Goblins gain +1 to hit whilst fighting in swamps and +1 to Survival, Tracking, Move Silently and Hide in Shadows task checks (this bonus increases to +2 in swamps).

Marsh Goblins also have a gift for illusion magic: saving throws against illusions created by Marsh Goblins are made at -2. Marsh Goblins also have a +2 to their own saving throws against illusions.

Marsh Goblins have the following classes available to them: Acrobat, Assassin, Barbarian, Bounty Hunter, Chaos Mage, Diablo, Druid, Fighter, Magic-User (Illusionist), Priest (Fighting, Trickster), Ranger, Scout, Shaman, Sorceror, Thief, Tomb Raider, Venturer, and Warlock.

They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Assassin-Illusionist, Assassin-Priest (Trickster), Assassin-Sorceror, Assassin-Venturer, Chaos Mage-Scout, Fighter-Illusionist, Fighter-Scout, Fighter-Thief, Fighter-Venturer, Illusionist-Scout, Illusionist-Thief, Illusionist-Venturer, Scout-Sorceror, Sorceror-Venturer.

Monday, 23 September 2019

Furry Foresters: The Ar-Thana for Blood & Treasure


AR-THANA



These sleek, feline humanoids are nomads of plain and forest. Prone to sudden outbreaks of pique and playfulness, they are remarkable physical specimens, masterful hunters and scouts. Ar-thana favour the Neutral alignments.

Ar-thana average 58” in height and have a movement rate of 40’ due to their exceptional speed. The Ar-thana appear very much as bipedal panthers, lightly clad (if at all). They range in colour from deep black to russet and gold. Their lives are short, however, 60 years at most. Ar-thana begin play with their own language, Ar-thana.

Ar-thana are extremely agile and engaging, but they are prone to foolishness and inattention as well as being somewhat frail, gaining +2 to Dexterity, +1 to Charisma but suffering a -1 penalty to Wisdom and Constitution. They have the following minimum/maximum ability scores: STR 3/17, INT 3/18, WIS 3/17, DEX 9/19, CON 3/17, and CHA 3/18. They roll 2d4 +1 for their Heritage score, for they generally live at a low level of ‘civilisation’, although their society is highly complex.

Ar-thana can only be surprised on a roll of 1-2. They also gain a +1 to all Tracking task checks and saving throws against breath weapons, rays and traps. In tall grasses and forests, Ar-thana may add +2 to any Move Silently and Hide in Shadows checks.

Ar-thana have the following classes available: Acrobat, Barbarian, Bard*, Beastmaster, Druid, Lucky Bastard, Monk, Priest (Creation), Ranger, Ronin, Scout, Sentinel, Shaman, Thief, Tomb Raider.
They may also pursue the following multi-classing options: Druid-Monk, Shaman-Monk.

*Ar-thana Bards are known as Plainsingers, and replace the Bard ability to Carouse with the Ranger’s Tracking skill and the ability to Open Locks and Pick Pockets with the Druid’s ability to leave no trace of their passage. They learn Basic Druid spells instead of Magic-User spells, and must be Neutral in alignment.

Apologies for the long absence: it's been a rather crap year so far, with health problems aplenty in my family. Hope you like the Ar-Thana!

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